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Walt Whitman, Ed Begley - Crossing Brooklyn Ferry & Other Poems download mp3 album

Walt Whitman, Ed Begley  - Crossing Brooklyn Ferry & Other Poems download mp3 album
Performer:
Album:
Crossing Brooklyn Ferry & Other Poems
Style:
Poetry
Released:
1968
Country:
US
FLAC vers. size:
1656 mb
MP3 vers. size:
1493 mb
WMA vers. size:
1276 mb
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4.8 ★
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746

Crossing Brooklyn Ferry.

Walt Whitman: Poems study guide contains a biography of Walt Whitman, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis. The speaker then "approaches" his readers more closely and claims that they see each other in the same way. He reiterates the eternal connection between all human beings. In the 10th verse, he exclaims that nothing is more beautiful or admirable than his view of stately Manhattan from his ferry. Analysis: Walt Whitman wrote "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" before the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge (which was completed in 1883). During Whitman's time, the ferry was the way most commuters traveled between Brooklyn and Manhattan. Additionally, Whitman wrote this poem at the cusp of the American Civil War, during a time when America's identity was deeply bifurcated.

Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" is a poem by Walt Whitman, and is part of his collection Leaves of Grass. It describes the ferry trip across the East River from Manhattan to Brooklyn at the exact location that was to become the Brooklyn Bridge. The speaker begins half an hour before sunset, and continues into the evening with a description comparing the tides to the attraction of New York City.

Whitman wrote "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" in the years before the American Civil War. As you read Whitman's rhetoric about a great Soul and the solidarity of all peoples, keep in mind that the nation was in the process of splintering into deadly rivals. The barriers "between us" that Whitman refers to were very real in the late 1850s. Whitman was a tireless (some might say shameless) self-promoter, and you could attribute some of his more sensational poetic tendencies, like the frequent use of exclamation marks, to that knack for grabbing attention that he honed as a journalist. Whitman's big break as a poet was also one of the most important events in American literature: the publication of Leaves of Grass in 1855. The poem we now call "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" was published in 1856 under the title "Sun Down Poem.

Crossing Brooklyn Ferry. Song of Myself, section 26. I Sing the Body Electric, section 3 (from Children of Adam). No Labor-Saving Machine (from Calamus). By Blue Ontario’s Shore, section 17. Side Two Listen. The speaker begins half an hour before sunset, and continues into the evening with a description comparing the tides to the attraction of New York City The poem.

Crossing Brooklyn Ferry first appeared in 1856 under the title Sun-Down Poem. The original and revised titles introduce the temporal and spatial figures that play such important parts in the poem and in the context of Whitman’s other writings.

In his poem, Crossing the Brooklyn Ferry, Whitman envisions a hopeful future for America, while subtly warning of the dismal future that could easily happen if American’s were not careful. In the poem, Crossing the Bar by Alfred, Lord Tennyson the poet speaks about a journey to the other side, or in other words, death. He uses imagery to describe someone that is ready to set sail on a voyage of no return. We always think of death as something dark, something awful, even scary; however, because of the imagery in this poem, death does not seem scary at all.

Tracklist

Crossing Brooklyn Ferry 13:29
Song Of Myself, Section 26 2:29
I Sing The Body Electric, Section 3 (From Children Of Adam) 1:34
No Labor-Saving Machine (From Calamus) 0:34
By Blue Ontario's Shore, Section 17 1:56
Pioneers! O Pioneers! (From Birds Of Passage) 7:24
A Song Of The Rolling Earth, Sections 1-4 11:35
The World Below The Brine (From Sea-Drift) 1:19
After The Sea-Ship (From Sea-Drift) 1:09
A Clear Midnight (From From Noon To Starry Night) 0:32
Now Finale To The Shore (From Songs Of Parting) 0:43

Versions

Category Artist Title (Format) Label Category Country Year
TC 1233 Walt Whitman, Ed Begley Walt Whitman, Ed Begley - Crossing Brooklyn Ferry & Other Poems ‎(LP, Album) Caedmon Records TC 1233 US 1968
CDL 51233 Walt Whitman, Ed Begley Walt Whitman, Ed Begley - Crossing Brooklyn Ferry And Other Poems ‎(Cass) Caedmon Records CDL 51233 US 1969